Blog

Benefits of Intermodulation Suppression Panels for Congested Sites

Benefits of Intermodulation Suppression Panels for Congested Sites

Benefits of Intermodulation Suppression Panels for Congested Sites

It is common for multiple radio and wireless service providers to share communications sites and cell towers, and this proximity often results in spectrum congestion. Radio frequency interference can originate from a wide number of sources, from natural phenomena such as lightning and sun spots to high power broadcast systems like AM/FM radio and TV transmitters, 2-way radio, paging, cell phones, and emergency and public safety communications systems, power lines, transformers, medical equipment, as well as any device that produces RF energy.

How to Select Receiver Distribution Panels – Weighing the Features and Performance Factors

How to Select Receiver Distribution Panels – Weighing the Features and Performance Factors

An ideal telecommunications tower site would have every band in critical industrial, commercial, and public safety spectrum fitted with a dedicated antenna and receive unit for optimum sensitivity. However, the large size of 30 MHz to 960 MHz antennas and radio equipment, and the congestion of many tower sites, often requires the receive antennas to pull double-, or multi-, duty.

How Telecommunication Duplexers for Base Stations Work and What to Know About Duplexers

How Telecommunication Duplexers for Base Stations Work and What to Know About Duplexers

How Telecommunication Duplexers for Base Stations Work and What to Know About Duplexers

The term duplexer refers to an electronic device that enables forward and reverse (transmit and receive) signals to travel in a single signal path. For telecommunication applications with densely populated towers and expensive premiums on leasing antenna space, duplexers can allow a single antenna to operate as a transmit and receive antenna.

How Antennas Work

How Antennas Work

An antenna is a mechanical structure by which electromagnetic waves are sent out or received.

An antenna accomplishes this by being made so that its structure will be resonant at the frequency or frequencies of interest. At the heart of most common antennas is what is known as a dipole. In the simplest form this can be two metal rods, typically one pointed up and the other pointed down with the feed point being between them.